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Mental health is a topic close to my heart. Growing up in Honduras, where mental health was not acknowledged or even discussed, I went through a lot of dark seasons without really knowing what was going on in my brain and emotions. Since then, I’ve realized that this– suffering in silence–is a shared experience across many different POC communities. So, it’s now a mission of mine to raise awareness and spread hope through my art and writing.

The main inspiration for these art pieces comes from holding space for the dual nature of mental health–the dark and painful brokenness we experience, and the beauty and hope that comes from healing and becoming whole in Christ. The use of grungy colors and textures is intended to show the reality and validity of mental health with a juxtaposition of neon colors and flowers for the beauty and healing that is possible with God.

We live in a world of toxic positivity, where motivational quotes sound nice from far away but overlook the complex reality of mental health. It’s easy to say “just smile,” “yes, you can!” or even “pray more,” but mental health is not always a straightforward, x-marks-the-spot journey. Healing and working on our mental health is a work in progress. The messiness and imperfect elements intentionally combat the picture-perfect highlight reels we see on social media.

- Nat Maxey

by Nat Maxey
MANIFESTO STATEMENT

Beauty and brokenness coexist in our stories.

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by Mondo Scott
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Poquito Más

Micah Bournes

Micah Bournes is a poet and musician from Long Beach, California. He is most known for his dynamic performance of spoken word poetry. His work often includes vulnerable narratives related to culture, justice, and faith. He has released five studio albums, is the author of "Here Comes This Dreamer", and co-editor of "Fight Evil With Poetry: Anthology Volume One".

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Poquito Más


There is little room for want

when I eat a shrimp burrito for dinner

When a friend and I harmonize

to love songs we wrote together

When home is a house full of artists

Walls full of canvas

When my bookshelves are bursting with spines

When there are nutrients for my hungry mind

When I fight for my right to live

and live

When my sickness is not yet unto death

When the beauty I began to doubt is revealed

When the poem finally arrives in the 23rd hour

When dreams fill my days with good sweat

My nights with good rest

When my bedroom walls sing the blues with black pride

When my room transforms into a habitat

A haven

When a haven is only as peaceful as 

the soul that dwells in it

When my soul creates calm instead of longing for it

When my still waters are stirred by the life they invite

When tomorrow makes no promises

When that mystery makes me smile

When the unknown 

is more adventure than anxiety

When there is ample reason to complain

but I save this breath for bellowing joy

When perspectives shift

When gratitude becomes discipline

When discipline creates more freedom than

refusing to commit

When commitment feels less like a leash

More like love

When love feels more like it exists

When existence is more gift than crisis

When life is a work of art

When I trust there is an author

When I trust in the author

and the story being written 

is not lacking a thing

When my cup runneth over

but my table is never full

When my heart always has room

for a little more

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As we at Pax were developing this StoryArc on mental health, the Japanese art form known as kintsugi was mentioned. I first learned about kintsugi (金継ぎ, "golden joinery"), also known as kintsukuroi (金繕い, "golden repair”) from a 2019 presentation by Japanese artist Makoto Fujimura, who at the time was the director of the Brehm Center’s Culture Care Initiative at Fuller Seminary. 

Kintsugi is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery by mending the areas of breakage with lacquer dusted or mixed with powdered gold. This form of artistic peacemaking embodies a philosophical reality; it celebrates breakage and repair as a part of the story of an object, rather than something to disguise or be discarded.  

I wanted to highlight this art form, infused in cultural tradition, to give sanctified imagination to how beauty and brokenness can coexist in our stories. The practice of mending the broken with gold makes the object more valuable than it was before it was fractured. This then becomes a tactile and representative expression of God’s ongoing healing work within our unique stories. It's not just a reminder of what God does but also a statement of who God is. We have a God who, in Christ, incarnated himself into our blessed and broken existence. This human God is not only aware of our sufferings but shares in them. Jesus, God in flesh, who shows his scars on the other side of the resurrection, is our wounded healer. Our Lord Jesus is making all things new, including us. I hope this simple visual serves as a reminder and invites you into that reality.

- Mondo Scott

by Mondo Scott

A Sound Theology of Mental Health

Paul Lu

Dr. Paul Lu is a clinical assistant professor of management science at Chapman University, Argyros School of Business and Economics. Paul also serves as the FaithNet Coordinator for National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) in Orange County, California. Paul is a member of the National FaithNet Advisory Group and the NAMI California Board of Directors. He has a daughter with a few different mental health diagnoses; most recently, she was diagnosed with schizophrenia. Paul’s ministry and passion are to reach out to residents at mental health facilities who cannot travel to faith organizations to participate in worship and fellowship. Paul holds a doctorate of business administration degree, a master of aeronautical science degree, and a master of theology degree. He recently received a doctorate of ministry degree at Fuller Theological Seminary. His research is focused on faith and mental illness.

Some time ago, the mother of a child with a mental health disorder shared with me the frustrations she had experienced at her church. When she asked church leaders for support, they denied that her child had a mental disorder. And if anything was wrong, they said, the mother and child were to blame. 

The mother did not know what to do. Their family had attended this church since before her kids were born. Now, in their moment of need, the church cast blame and did not assist. This family contemplated leaving the church and seeking help only from outside the church. 

This is quite a common story at many churches. The body of Christ, in general, is poorly equipped to respond and show hospitality to the mental health needs of their communities. And many families have been deeply hurt as a result. Churches and faith communities should be places of healing and hope, where those who struggle with mental health are welcomed with compassion, respect, and honor. But we can only do that when we develop a robust, God-centered perspective on mental health.

According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, mental health “includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices.” Each person’s mental health is impacted by multiple factors, including biology, genetics, trauma, socioeconomic status, and their environment. The World Health Organization considers mental health to be “an integral part of health; indeed, there is no health without mental health.”

Today mental disorders affect one in five adults, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness. About 5 percent of adults, or one in twenty, experience serious mental illness. In the US alone, 40 million adults suffer from some form of anxiety; among those, nearly half have been diagnosed with a depressive disorder. Mental health conditions are more prevalent among women compared to men, and 17 percent of youth aged six to seventeen have a mental health disorder.

Mental health challenges impact those who are suffering, but also their family members and friends. They can influence an individual’s ability to relate to and function in society, making it difficult to focus in school, hold down a job, or make friends. In many instances, mental health conditions can lead to disappointment as individual dreams and visions are shattered. Family members acting as caregivers may expend significant energy and financial resources. At least 8.4 million Americans provide care to adults with mental disorders, spending an average of 32 hours per week providing unpaid care. 

In some communities, those with mental health conditions may be isolated and ostracized due to widely believed myths and stigmas. For instance, in many Asian cultures, parents may refuse to believe their children have mental disorders and do not permit them to receive treatment. This dismissal of mental health needs is also prevalent in Latino and African American communities. But the mental health struggles are still there: 14 percent of Asians, 17 percent of Blacks, 18 percent of Latino individuals, 32 percent of multiracial adults, and 44 percent of LGBTQ individuals experience mental disorders. 

Contrary to the common teaching that “good” Christians should not struggle with “bad” mental health, followers of Jesus experience mental health challenges as much as the general population. We even see this in Scripture. For instance, Job says, “I am not at ease, nor am I quiet; I have no rest; but trouble comes” (3:26). This provides a glimpse into Job’s mental and emotional suffering. David, who wrote some of the most wrenching laments in the Bible, at one point cries out to God, “Come quickly, Lord, and answer me, for my depression deepens” (Psa. 143:6, NLT). And the prophet Elijah, as he runs for his life from Queen Jezebel, laments, “It is enough; now, O Lord, take away my life, for I am no better than my ancestors” (1 Kings 19:4).  These are only a few of the many people in the Bible who experience mental health struggles in their journey with God. 

In more recent times, mental health issues have continued to affect prominent leaders of the church. For instance, Martin Luther suffered from depression during his time as a monk. Nineteenth-century theologian Charles Spurgeon also suffered from depression, which he said he would not wish on anyone. Christian apologist J.P. Moreland tells of his battle with debilitating anxiety, including panic attacks, in his book Finding Quiet: My Story of Overcoming Anxiety and the Practices that Brought Peace.

Although there are countless instances of God’s people struggling with mental health, churches often view mental health very differently from physical health. There is still a pervasive belief among Christians that mental health conditions are spiritual conditions that require only spiritual solutions. Some see mental disorders as a sign of spiritual weakness or lack of faith. Some think such conditions result from the sins of individuals or that of their parents, ideas that existed even in biblical times (Ex. 34:7, Num. 14:18, Deut. 5:9). 

Such views of mental health have been around since ancient times, but they don’t take into account the many scientific discoveries made in the past century of how our minds work. We know now that all mental health conditions are medical conditions, and they require care and treatment just as physical ailments do. In addition to spiritual support, other approaches that have been shown to effectively relieve the symptoms of mental health disorders for most include therapy and medication. Our brains are as much a part of our physical bodies as our hearts, lungs, and livers. We need to honor the needs of our minds and mental health as much as the needs of our bodies and physical health.

When Christians and churches fail to understand these realities and instead mischaracterize mental health disorders as spiritual failures, this leads to unwarranted judgment and shame directed toward innocent individuals. This can cause isolation from others in the church. In such environments, some may not disclose their suffering and choose instead to live in quiet desperation. 

At a mental health conference I attended in 2018, Chamique Holdsclaw, an all-star player of the Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) who is bipolar, discussed the stigma and shame she experienced at her church. After she disclosed her condition, some church members would physically distance themselves from her during worship service, as if she were contagious. Others blamed her or judged her for her illness.  

Given how common mental health issues are among people, including Christians, we may wonder why a loving God would allow such suffering. The prophet Jeremiah expresses this sense of confusion and rejection: “But why, why this chronic pain, this ever worsening wound and no healing in sight? You’re nothing, God, but a mirage, a lovely oasis in the distance—and then nothing!” (Jer. 15:18, MSG) Such anger and frustration at God may cause those with mental health struggles and their family members and friends to leave the church.

Amidst the pain and suffering, God does understand. Toward the end of the book of Jonah, the prophet declares, “And now, O Lord, please take my life from me, for it is better for me to die than to live.” God does not condemn Jonah or become angry with him. Instead, the Lord engages Jonah, gently asking, “Is it right for you to be angry?”  (4:3-4) After all that had happened, God could have given up on Jonah. But he continues to be patient. He understands Jonah’s frustration and doubts.

In the gospel of John, Jesus encounters a man blind from birth. His disciples ask, “Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?” Jesus answers, “Neither this man nor his parents sinned; he was born blind so that God’s works might be revealed in him” (John 9:1-3).

Here, Jesus affirms that our illnesses and limitations are not a punishment for our sins or that of our parents. Having emotional disorders or other mental health challenges is not anyone’s fault. Instead, it is so that we may be witnesses for God’s goodness. The Lord’s unconditional love and wise purposes are not diminished for those with mental health challenges. Instead of looking to blame, judge, or shame those who are struggling, we should look for the image of God, and evidence of his work, in that individual. 

This is not a promise that God will heal our mental health struggles. We may never be healed. But God does extraordinary things in and through those who are wounded. Even without healing, you may be doing transformational work for God. You may be given insights that are particularly attuned to the limitations and struggles of others. You may become an embodied example of God’s grace and compassion in your communities. 

Here is the Lord’s response to Jeremiah after the prophet laments his pain and questions God: “Take back those words, and I'll take you back. Then you'll stand tall before me. Use words truly and well. Don't stoop to cheap whining. Then, but only then, you'll speak for me. Let your words change them. Don't change your words to suit them. I'll turn you into a steel wall, a thick steel wall, impregnable” (Jer. 15:19-20, MSG).

Speak the truth, God says, and do not be afraid to share your story and testimony exactly as you are. You will see God working in your challenges. Others who suffer from similar issues may feel empowered to start sharing as well. You may help create a safe space for honest vulnerability and requests for help. Your openness and courage can lead to a groundswell that exposes needs in churches that others can no longer ignore. 

Singer Demi Lovato has been public about her significant struggles with depression. But she has seen how God is working through her depression. "God gave me a voice, not just to sing with. He put me through those things, which seemed horrible at the time, but they were so worth it. With the obstacles I've overcome, I can help people," she explains.

While medication, therapy, diet, and other forms of treatment are essential for those with mental health disorders to live in more healthy, balanced ways, there is also an important role for the church in addressing mental health. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration recommends a holistic approach that promotes emotional, spiritual, intellectual, physical, environmental, financial, occupational, and social wellness. Churches and faith communities can support many of these areas. According to Dr. Harold G. Koenig, director of the Center for Spirituality, Theology and Health at Duke University Medical Center, multiple studies have shown that “people who are more involved in religious practices and who are more religiously committed seem to cope better with stress.” Some of the benefits of being connected to faith and a faith community include a sense of meaning and purpose, a lens through which to interpret hardship, grounding practices, and support and encouragement from others.

This is the potential that most of our churches have not yet lived up to because we have chosen instead to judge, blame, or hold onto false beliefs about mental health. But churches should be safe and welcoming spaces for people who struggle with their mental health. Churches should be a place where Christians sincerely and consistently advocate for one another in our suffering. Churches should be communities where the truth and wisdom earned by those who struggle with mental health can be shared, and where compassion and grace can overflow.

Our faith communities need individuals who know what it is to wrestle with mental health. We need their voices and their leadership. Our communities benefit greatly when we honor the wisdom and discipleship they have gained from their lived experiences. And our God, who understands our suffering and extends unending love and grace, will be honored and worshipped through our solidarity with one another.

Some time ago, the mother of a child with a mental health disorder shared with me the frustrations she had experienced at her church. When she asked church leaders for support, they denied that her child had a mental disorder. And if anything was wrong, they said, the mother and child were to blame. 

The mother did not know what to do. Their family had attended this church since before her kids were born. Now, in their moment of need, the church cast blame and did not assist. This family contemplated leaving the church and seeking help only from outside the church. 

This is quite a common story at many churches. The body of Christ, in general, is poorly equipped to respond and show hospitality to the mental health needs of their communities. And many families have been deeply hurt as a result. Churches and faith communities should be places of healing and hope, where those who struggle with mental health are welcomed with compassion, respect, and honor. But we can only do that when we develop a robust, God-centered perspective on mental health.

Churches and faith communities should be places of healing and hope, where those who struggle with mental health are welcomed with compassion, respect, and honor.

According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, mental health “includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices.” Each person’s mental health is impacted by multiple factors, including biology, genetics, trauma, socioeconomic status, and their environment. The World Health Organization considers mental health to be “an integral part of health; indeed, there is no health without mental health.”

Today mental disorders affect one in five adults, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness. About 5 percent of adults, or one in twenty, experience serious mental illness. In the US alone, 40 million adults suffer from some form of anxiety; among those, nearly half have been diagnosed with a depressive disorder. Mental health conditions are more prevalent among women compared to men, and 17 percent of youth aged six to seventeen have a mental health disorder.

Mental health challenges impact those who are suffering, but also their family members and friends. They can influence an individual’s ability to relate to and function in society, making it difficult to focus in school, hold down a job, or make friends. In many instances, mental health conditions can lead to disappointment as individual dreams and visions are shattered. Family members acting as caregivers may expend significant energy and financial resources. At least 8.4 million Americans provide care to adults with mental disorders, spending an average of 32 hours per week providing unpaid care. 

Contrary to the common teaching that “good” Christians should not struggle with “bad” mental health, followers of Jesus experience mental health challenges as much as the general population.

In some communities, those with mental health conditions may be isolated and ostracized due to widely believed myths and stigmas. For instance, in many Asian cultures, parents may refuse to believe their children have mental disorders and do not permit them to receive treatment. This dismissal of mental health needs is also prevalent in Latino and African American communities. But the mental health struggles are still there: 14 percent of Asians, 17 percent of Blacks, 18 percent of Latino individuals, 32 percent of multiracial adults, and 44 percent of LGBTQ individuals experience mental disorders. 

Contrary to the common teaching that “good” Christians should not struggle with “bad” mental health, followers of Jesus experience mental health challenges as much as the general population. We even see this in Scripture. For instance, Job says, “I am not at ease, nor am I quiet; I have no rest; but trouble comes” (3:26). This provides a glimpse into Job’s mental and emotional suffering. David, who wrote some of the most wrenching laments in the Bible, at one point cries out to God, “Come quickly, Lord, and answer me, for my depression deepens” (Psa. 143:6, NLT). And the prophet Elijah, as he runs for his life from Queen Jezebel, laments, “It is enough; now, O Lord, take away my life, for I am no better than my ancestors” (1 Kings 19:4).  These are only a few of the many people in the Bible who experience mental health struggles in their journey with God. 

In more recent times, mental health issues have continued to affect prominent leaders of the church. For instance, Martin Luther suffered from depression during his time as a monk. Nineteenth-century theologian Charles Spurgeon also suffered from depression and coined the phrase, “the dark night of the soul,” which he said he would not wish on anyone. Christian apologist J.P. Moreland tells of his battle with debilitating anxiety, including panic attacks, in his book Finding Quiet: My Story of Overcoming Anxiety and the Practices that Brought Peace.

Although there are countless instances of God’s people struggling with mental health, churches often view mental health very differently from physical health. There is still a pervasive belief among Christians that mental health conditions are spiritual conditions that require only spiritual solutions. Some see mental disorders as a sign of spiritual weakness or lack of faith. Some think such conditions result from the sins of individuals or that of their parents, ideas that existed even in biblical times (Ex. 34:7, Num. 14:18, Deut. 5:9). 

Such views of mental health have been around since ancient times, but they don’t take into account the many scientific discoveries made in the past century of how our minds work. We know now that all mental health conditions are medical conditions, and they require care and treatment just as physical ailments do. In addition to spiritual support, other approaches that have been shown to effectively relieve the symptoms of mental health disorders for most include therapy and medication. Our brains are as much a part of our physical bodies as our hearts, lungs, and livers. We need to honor the needs of our minds and mental health as much as the needs of our bodies and physical health.

When Christians and churches fail to understand these realities and instead mischaracterize mental health disorders as spiritual failures, this leads to unwarranted judgment and shame directed toward innocent individuals. This can cause isolation from others in the church. In such environments, some may not disclose their suffering and choose instead to live in quiet desperation. 

At a mental health conference I attended in 2018, Chamique Holdsclaw, an all-star player of the Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) who is bipolar, discussed the stigma and shame she experienced at her church. After she disclosed her condition, some church members would physically distance themselves from her during worship service, as if she were contagious. Others blamed her or judged her for her illness.  

Instead of looking to blame, judge, or shame those who are struggling, we should look for the image of God, and evidence of his work, in that individual.

Given how common mental health issues are among people, including Christians, we may wonder why a loving God would allow such suffering. The prophet Jeremiah expresses this sense of confusion and rejection: “But why, why this chronic pain, this ever worsening wound and no healing in sight? You’re nothing, God, but a mirage, a lovely oasis in the distance—and then nothing!” (Jer. 15:18, MSG) Such anger and frustration at God may cause those with mental health struggles and their family members and friends to leave the church.

Amidst the pain and suffering, God does understand. Toward the end of the book of Jonah, the prophet declares, “And now, O Lord, please take my life from me, for it is better for me to die than to live.” God does not condemn Jonah or become angry with him. Instead, the Lord engages Jonah, gently asking, “Is it right for you to be angry?”  (4:3-4) After all that had happened, God could have given up on Jonah. But he continues to be patient. He understands Jonah’s frustration and doubts.

In the gospel of John, Jesus encounters a man blind from birth. His disciples ask, “Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?” Jesus answers, “Neither this man nor his parents sinned; he was born blind so that God’s works might be revealed in him” (John 9:1-3).

Here, Jesus affirms that our illnesses and limitations are not a punishment for our sins or that of our parents. Having emotional disorders or other mental health challenges is not anyone’s fault. Instead, it is so that we may be witnesses for God’s goodness. The Lord’s unconditional love and wise purposes are not diminished for those with mental health challenges. Instead of looking to blame, judge, or shame those who are struggling, we should look for the image of God, and evidence of his work, in that individual. 

This is not a promise that God will heal our mental health struggles. We may never be healed. But God does extraordinary things in and through those who are wounded. Even without healing, you may be doing transformational work for God. You may be given insights that are particularly attuned to the limitations and struggles of others. You may become an embodied example of God’s grace and compassion in your communities. 

Here is the Lord’s response to Jeremiah after the prophet laments his pain and questions God: “Take back those words, and I'll take you back. Then you'll stand tall before me. Use words truly and well. Don't stoop to cheap whining. Then, but only then, you'll speak for me. Let your words change them. Don't change your words to suit them. I'll turn you into a steel wall, a thick steel wall, impregnable” (Jer. 15:19-20, MSG).

While medication, therapy, diet, and other forms of treatment are essential for those with mental health disorders to live in more healthy, balanced ways, there is also an important role for the church in addressing mental health.

Speak the truth, God says, and do not be afraid to share your story and testimony exactly as you are. You will see God working in your challenges. Others who suffer from similar issues may feel empowered to start sharing as well. You may help create a safe space for honest vulnerability and requests for help. Your openness and courage can lead to a groundswell that exposes needs in churches that others can no longer ignore. 

Singer Demi Lovato has been public about her significant struggles with depression. But she has seen how God is working through her depression. "God gave me a voice, not just to sing with. He put me through those things, which seemed horrible at the time, but they were so worth it. With the obstacles I've overcome, I can help people," she explains.

While medication, therapy, diet, and other forms of treatment are essential for those with mental health disorders to live in more healthy, balanced ways, there is also an important role for the church in addressing mental health. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration recommends a holistic approach that promotes emotional, spiritual, intellectual, physical, environmental, financial, occupational, and social wellness. Churches and faith communities can support many of these areas. According to Dr. Harold G. Koenig, director of the Center for Spirituality, Theology and Health at Duke University Medical Center, multiple studies have shown that “people who are more involved in religious practices and who are more religiously committed seem to cope better with stress.” Some of the benefits of being connected to faith and a faith community include a sense of meaning and purpose, a lens through which to interpret hardship, grounding practices, and support and encouragement from others.

This is the potential that most of our churches have not yet lived up to because we have chosen instead to judge, blame, or hold onto false beliefs about mental health. But churches should be safe and welcoming spaces for people who struggle with their mental health. Churches should be a place where Christians sincerely and consistently advocate for one another in our suffering. Churches should be communities where the truth and wisdom earned by those who struggle with mental health can be shared, and where compassion and grace can overflow.

Our faith communities need individuals who know what it is to wrestle with mental health. We need their voices and their leadership. Our communities benefit greatly when we honor the wisdom and discipleship they have gained from their lived experiences. And our God, who understands our suffering and extends unending love and grace, will be honored and worshipped through our solidarity with one another.

1 Laila Lalami, Conditional Citizens: On Belonging in America, 1st ed. (New York: Pantheon Books, 2020), 70.
2 See chapter two in Daniel Carrol’s The Bible and Borders: Hearing God's Word on Immigration (Grand Rapids, MI: Brazos Press, 2020).
3 Julio L. Martínez, Citizenship, Migrations and Religion: An Ethical Dialogue Based on the Christian Faith (Madrid: Universidad Pontificia Comillas, 2007), 51.
4 Peter Phan, "The Experience of Migration in the United States as a Source of Intercultural Theology," in E. Padilla E. and P.C. Phan (eds.) Contemporary Issues of Migration and Theology (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013), 148.

Churches and faith communities should be places of healing and hope, where those who struggle with mental health are welcomed with compassion, respect, and honor.
Contrary to the common teaching that “good” Christians should not struggle with “bad” mental health, followers of Jesus experience mental health challenges as much as the general population.
Instead of looking to blame, judge, or shame those who are struggling, we should look for the image of God, and evidence of his work, in that individual.
While medication, therapy, diet, and other forms of treatment are essential for those with mental health disorders to live in more healthy, balanced ways, there is also an important role for the church in addressing mental health.
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How Mental Health
Struggles Changed Me

In this frank, informal conversation, PAX editorial director Dorcas Cheng-Tozun and spiritual director Osheta Moore dive deep into their respective struggles with anxiety, depression, and trauma. They discuss how anxiety helped them achieve but ultimately couldn’t be sustainable; how their family backgrounds affected their own perspectives of mental health; the interventions they tried; and how mental health challenges have changed the way they view themselves, others, and God.
Dorcas Cheng-Tozun

Dorcas Cheng-Tozun is the editorial director of PAX, an award-winning writer, and a communications consultant. She has served in the nonprofit and social enterprise sectors for more than fifteen years, including stints in mainland China, Hong Kong, and Kenya. Dorcas is the author of two books, Start Love Repeat: How to Stay in Love with Your Entrepreneur in a Crazy Start-up World and Let There d.light: How One Social Enterprise Brought Solar Products to 100 Million People. Her next book, Social Justice for the Sensitive Soul, will be released in 2023. She lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with her husband and two hapa sons.

Osheta Moore

Osheta Moore, PAX’s spiritual director, is a Black, Southern, everyday peacemaker. She serves as community life pastor at Roots Covenant and adjunct teacher at Woodland Hills Church in St. Paul, Minnesota. Osheta is the author of Shalom Sistas: Living Wholeheartedly in a Broken World, and Dear White Peacemakers: Dismantling Racism with Grit and Grace, on anti-racism peacemaking.

MYTH   >